We provide a variety of construction services to our clients in Grande Prairie and the surrounding Area.

RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL SEPTIC SYSTEMS AND CISTERN INSTALLATION IN GRANDE PRAIRIE

CERTIFIED SEPTIC INSTALLATION AND DESIGN

Proud members of the Alberta Onsite Wastewater Management Association.

Certified to install and design any septic system for your acreage, farm or commercial property.

Septic Grande Prairie

TEST PITS, SOIL SAMPLING AND MODEL PROCESS

We can do soil sampling to determine what septic system you will need for your new project or your upcoming subdivision.

Grande prairie landscaping companies

SEPTIC SYSTEMS SERVICING AND INSPECTION

Any septic systems maintenance, repair or inspection (including for real estate).

Grande prairie landscaping companies

EXCAVATION, SITE PREP AND LANDSCAPING

Approach, Road and Pad Building – Industrial lot grading, approaches, driveway, parking lots, garage or shop pads.

Landscaping – Top soil spreads, backfills, decorative ponds, dugouts, tree/brush removal, snow removal, etc.

Foundation Excavation – All residential and commercial foundation excavating.  All trenching.

Landscaping
Foundation Excavation
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FOUNDATIONS

Residential ICF Foundations

Commercial ICF Foundations

Residential ICF
Commercial ICF
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HAULING

Equipment Hauling
Tandem tractor and 50 tonne 53 foot long equipment trailer with air ramps.

Gravel, Dirt and Mulch Hauling and Supply
Tandem tractor with triaxle end dump and triaxle belly dump.

Small Hauls
One tonne pick ups
Tandem gooseneck equipment trailer
Triaxle gooseneck equipment trailer

Equipment Hauling
Gravel, Dirt and mulch Hauling and Supply
Small Hauls
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SOME OF OUR WORK

ABOUT SEPTIC SYSTEMS IN GRANDE PRAIRIE AND AREA

A septic system in Grande Prairie and area contains one or more concrete or plastic holding tanks of between 4000 and 7500 liters (1,000 and 2,000 gallons); one side is connected to an inlet wastewater pipe and the other is connected to the septic drain field., Usually, these pipe connections are made with a T pipe, allowing water to enter and exit without interacting with the crust on the surface. Today, the design of the septic systems in Grande Prairie and area usually incorporates two chambers, each come equipped with a manhole cover and divided by a separating wall with openings located about midway between the floor and roof of the septic tank.

Wastewater enters the first chamber of the tank, thus allowing solids to settle and scum to rise. The settled solids are anaerobically digested, reducing the overall number of solids. The liquid elements flow through the separating wall into the second chamber, where further settlement takes place. The extra liquid, now in a somewhat clear condition, then drains from the outlet into the septic drain field, also can be called a leach field, drain field or seepage field, depending upon your region. A percolation test is required before installation to ensure the porosity of the soil is good enough to serve as a drain field for the septic system.

The leftover impurities are contained and filtered in the soil, with the extra water eliminated through percolation into the soil, through evaporation, and by absorption through the root system of plants and eventually transpiration or entering groundwater/surface water. A piping system in Grande Prairie and area, often laid in a stone-filled trench distributes the wastewater throughout the field with multiple drainage holes in the network. The dimensions of the drain field are proportional to the amount of wastewater and inversely proportional to the porosity of the drainage field. The entire septic system can operate by gravity alone or, where topographic considerations require, with the inclusion of a lift pump. Certain septic system designs in Grande Prairie and area include siphons or other devices to increase the amount and velocity of outflow to the drainage field. These aids to fill the drainage pipe more evenly and extends the drainage field life by preventing early clogging or bioclogging.